Health and Wellness

Health and Wellness

Health and Wellness Outline: I. When is too much enough? A. We all cope with issues differently, and we need to receive support from others . We don’t have to do it all alone. 1. Some people drink and smoke to get through problems! 2. Some people exercise to relieve their stress related issues! B. We all have morals, and sometimes, things happen that can cause us to have mental health issues or other issues. 1. Help is out there we just need to know what questions to ask, and how to ask them. 2. These issues can also contribute to heart problems, depression, anxiety, or even suicide. II. When do we need a break? A.

When we are parents we have perceptions of how our parental caring, contributes to our health status in midlife. 1. We all have problems every day, and we just need to learn to cope with all of them to allow us to keep ourselves healthy and well. 2. How does one keep ourselves healthy and well? B. Wellness promotion addresses mental and physical health. 1. The article reports the relationship between physical and mental health in all ages of children, teaching us how to promote both within schools. III. The most important reason when do we know when to much is too much, is because how do we maintain issues in our lives that can cause harm?

A. Define wellness, in terms of five dimensions. 1. The article also mentions what therapist, teachers, and councilors can do, to help promote wellness, in patients, and clients. 2. We need to exercise more, allowing ourselves to stay healthy and fit! B. We all have health behavior changes as we get older, some more than others. 1. Food, alcohol, death, stress, wellness, health, exercise and other problems have a tendency to contribute. 2. We need to focus on ourselves as we get older because problems usually show up more when we get older! Health and Wellness

When it concerns health and wellness, stress is seen as a negative state; that we attempt to deal with by using unhealthy behaviors and allow us believe. Behaviors because of stress cause death. Many health and wellness issues have been known to show positive contributions with morality! We have an interest in the relationships between physical and mental illness. We as individuals have to come to understand that mental health is essential when it concerns keeping ourselves healthy and well. Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death when it concerns health, wellness, and morality.

Allowing ourselves to understand the awareness of mortality and medical co-morbidity among patients with serious mental illness! An important predictor of future health has seen social support. How can we keep ourselves and children healthy, and well when it concerns every day experiences and circumstances beyond our control come up we were not expecting? High levels of perceived stress are associated with smoking initiation, because of increased levels from smoking, are less successful attempts due to cessation, drinking more alcohol than usual, and reports of positive attitudes toward drinking (Krueger, & Chang, (2008).

Being poor and coping with stress: Health behaviors and the risk of death. American Journal of Public Health, 98(5), pp. 889-896. ) Some of us exercise to control our stress, whereas others have a tendency to refuse to exercise because to them it is more rewarding to them in short term affects. Unhealthy behaviors we choose along with the stress contributions can lead to death. While morality, has linked to high levels of stressors in everyday life! To anyone’s knowledge, any research has not been documented when it concerns unhealthy behaviors, when it concerns relationships between morality and stress.

The first part of this study was to look at the unhealthy behaviors due to stress in adults when it concerns behaviors’ in stress, morality relationships. (Weighted Covariate Means and Proportions Among US Adults, by Vital Status and Socioeconomic Status (SES): 19 Being Poor and Coping With Stress: Health Behaviors and the Risk of Death. 90-1997 American Journal of Public Health, May(2008), Vol. 98 Issue 5, p889-896, 8p, 3 charts Chart; found on p891) Unstandardized Parameter Estimates and Hazard Ratios (HRs) From Gompertz Hazard Models of the Risk of Death among US Adults: 1990-1997 Being Poor and Coping With Stress: Health Behaviors and the Risk of Death. American Journal of Public Health, May (2008), Vol. 98 Issue 5, p889-896, 8p, 3 charts Chart; found on p892. ) (Unstandardized Parameter Estimates and Hazard Ratios (HRs) From Gompertz Hazard Models of the Risk of Death among US Adults, by Socioeconomic Status (SES): 1990-1997 Being Poor and Coping With Stress: Health Behaviors and the Risk of Death. American Journal of Public Health, May (2008), Vol. 8 Issue 5, p889-896, 8p, 3 charts Chart; found on p893. ) Numerous studies have documented the impact of excess mortality among patients with serious mental illness (Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). In 1985 Black and associates (1) found that death rates were higher than expected among psychiatric patients, primarily as a result of suicides and accidents ( Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 482-1487) . After extensively reviewing the literature a decade later, Felker and colleagues (2) found that standardized mortality ratios for both natural and unnatural causes of death among psychiatric patients were more than twice those of the general population (Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487 ).

I have reviewed information covering 20 studies and more than 8,000 psychiatric patients and concluded that 50 percent of psychiatric patients had known medical co morbidities, 35 percent harbored undiagnosed medical disorders, and an additional 20 percent had medical problems that may actually have caused or exasperated their psychiatric condition (2) (Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 482-1487). Dembling and associates (3) found that adult patients served by the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (MDMH) between 1985 and 1994 had a significantly higher frequency of deaths from accidental and intentional injuries. Reduced life expectancies across all disease and injury conditions within this population were also noted (Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv(2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). Miller, Brian Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). (Miller, Brian Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). (Miller, Brian Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 482-1487). (Miller, Brian Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). (Miller, Brian Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487). An important predictor of future health hapens to seem as social support. Social support reflects carinng and loving relaions in our everyday lives.

Intriguing results from a couple of studies suggest ratings when it comes to feeling loved to be as effective when accessing social support. Several test were run and here is some of the data analaysis due to first relationships when it concerns closeness and thouhts of warmth with parents, parental caring rating, and pros, and cons of parental caring! (Russell, & Schwartz, (1997). Perceptions of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 59(2), p. 144-149. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. ) (Russell, & Schwartz, (1997).

Perceptions of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 59(2), p. 144-149. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. ) (Russell, & Schwartz, (1997). Perceptions of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 59(2), p. 144-149. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. ) Wellness promotion addresses both the reduction of disorder and disease and the enhancement of mental and physical health (2007) Wiley Periodicals, Inc. . This article relates to the relationship between mental and physical health in children and adolescents, and how to promote both within schools (2007) Wiley Periodicals, Inc. ) Topics discussed include the benefits of (a) hope and optimism, (b) structured extracurricular activities, and (c) sport and exercise psychology for school-based health and wellness promotion (2007) Wiley Periodicals, Inc. ) These topics intertwine the potential to positively affect both mental and physical health in children and adolescents in schools (2007) Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hope and optimism are predictive of both physical and mental health in a variety of domains, including self-reported physical health, positive response to medical intervention, immunologic robustness, health-promoting behavior, and self-reports of subjective well-being and positive mood (Aspinwall & Brunhart, (2000); Peterson,(2000); Taylor, Kemeny, Reed, Bower, & Gruenewald,(2000). Children and youth spend much of their time in schools, educational facilities are ideal settings for providing interventions and prevention programs that promote hope and optimism.

For many youth, these pursuits consist of unstructured activities with little or no adult supervision such as, watching television, using the Internet. In moderation, participation in these sedentary leisure activities is innocuous, enjoyable, and depending on the activity, educational. Nevertheless, overreliance on unstructured, sedentary activities can result in chronic boredom along with lack of initiative (Shaw, Caldwell, & Kleiber, (1996). In 1996, the United States surgeon general released a landmark report detailing the benefits of physical activity and exercise. Physical benefits associated with regular xercise for both adults and children, such as decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and non–insulin dependent diabetes. School counselors; however report detailed psychological benefits of regular physical activity and exercise, such as less depression and anxiety, better mood, and better psychological well-being (Miller, Gilman, & Martens (2008). Wellness promotion in the schools: Enhancing students’ mental and physical health. Psychology in the Schools, 45(1), p. 5-15. ) As for the conclusion, “what have the readers learned about health and wellness when it comes to today’s economy? Stress is seen as a negative state, as an individual we need to know that there is help! We just need to know what questions to ask? Where we can go for help and what we need to start to keep ourselves healthy and well. So we can in turn function properly in every day society. Some signs mean the same thing for different aliments we need to know when enough is enough, and we need help! We do not have to take care of the problem all alone! Bibliography Being poor and coping with stress: Health behaviors and the risk of death. American Journal of Public Health, 98(5), p. 889-896. doi:10. 105/AJPH. 2007. 114454. Miller, Brian, Paschall, Bayard, III, Svendsen, Dale Mortality and Medical Co morbidity Among Patients With Serious Mental Illness Psychiatr Serv (2006) 57: p. 1482-1487 Russek ; Schwartz, (1997). Perceptions of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 59(2), p. 144-149. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. Townes (1984). Wellness: The emerging concept and its components. Individual Psychology: Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research ; Practice, 40(4), p. 372-383.

Retrieved from PsycINFO database. Evans (1996). Comment: The dominant role of driver behavior in traffic safety. American Journal of Public Health, 86(6), p. 784-786. doi:10. 2105/AJPH. 86. 6. 784. Zanjani, Schaie, ; Willis, (2006). Age Group and Health Status Effects on Health Behavior Change. Behavioral Medicine, 32(2), p. 36-46. doi:10. 3200/BMED. 32. 2. 36-46. Miller, Gilman, ; Martens, (2008). Wellness promotion in the schools: Enhancing students’ mental and physical health. Psychology in the Schools, 45(1), p. 5-15. doi:10. 1002/pits. 20274. Schuster, Dobson, Jauregui, & Blanks, (2004).

Wellness Lifestyles I: A Theoretical Framework Linking Wellness, Health Lifestyles, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 10(2), p. 349-356. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database. Shaw, Caldwell, & Kleiber, 1996 Aspinwall & Brunhart, 2000; Peterson, 2000; Taylor, Kemeny, Reed, Bower, & Gruenewald, 2000. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Axia College Material Appendix D Strategies for Gathering Information Source(Formatted using APA style guidelines)| What makes the source credible or noncredible? What information can you gather from this source? | American Journal of Public Health, Vol 98(5), May, 2008. pp. 889-896. Krueger, & Chang, (2008). Being poor and coping with stress: Health behaviors and the risk of death. American Journal of Public Health, 98(5), p. 889-896. doi:10. 2105/AJPH. 2007. 114454. | This article is credible because, it can be researched. It has also been researched by doctors, and all of the research is credible. The article also has credible charts and tables on the subject. | We all cope with issues differently, and we all need support from others to help us get through the problems.

We don’t have to do it all alone. | Sudders, (2002). Mortality Report 2000. 10. Retrieved from PsycEXTRA database| The research can be researched, and the references are credible in this report that was done on several individuals. | We all have morals, and sometimes, things happen that are way out of our control that can cause us to have mental health issues or other issues. There is help out there we just need to know what questions to ask, and how to ask them. These issues can also contribute to heart problems, depression, anxiety, or even suicide. | Russek, & Schwartz, (1997).

Perceptions of parental caring predict health status in midlife: A 35-year follow-up of the Harvard Mastery of Stress Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 59(2), p. 144-149. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. | This article can be researched and is credible, and shows bias in the article. The research and references can be backed up also. | When we are parents we have perceptions of how our parental caring, contributes to our health status in midlife. We all have problems every day, and we just need to learn to cope with all of them to allow us to keep ourselves healthy and well. | Townes, (1984).

Wellness: The emerging concept and its components. Individual Psychology: Journal of Adlerian Theory, Research & Practice, 40(4), p. 372-383. Retrieved from PsycINFO database. | This article can be researched and backed by the references the author shows bias. | The author defines wellness, in terms of five dimensions. The article also mentions what therapist, teachers, and councilors’ can do, to help promote wellness, in patients and clients. This article also promotes exercise! | Evans, (1996). Comment: The dominant role of driver behavior in traffic safety. American Journal of Public Health, 86(6), p. 84-786. doi:10. 2105/AJPH. 86. 6. 784. | The author here is bias, and the article is backed by the references that are given, and it can be further researched. | This article explains what we need to basically do to prevent a car accident that may cause death in the meantime. Anything distraction can cause you to have a accident. We always need to be extra cautious, it only takes 3 seconds to cause an accident from a distracted. So we need to make sure we keep our minds on the road, and stay safe. | Zanjani, Schaie & Willis, (2006). Age Group and Health Status Effects on Health Behavior Change.

Behavioral Medicine, 32(2), p. 36-46. doi:10. 3200/BMED. 32. 2. 36-46. | The article here is credible and can be backed by the references. The article also shows bias. | We all have health behavior changes as we get older, some more than others. Food, alcohol, death, stress, wellness, health, exercise and other problems have a tendency to contribute. We need to focus on ourselves as we get older because problems usually show up more than! | Miller, Gilman, & Martens, (2008). Wellness promotion in the schools: Enhancing students’ mental and physical health.

Psychology in the Schools, 45(1), p. 5-15. doi:10. 1002/pits. 20274. | The article here is credible and can be backed up through the references and researched even further. Bias is shown throughout the article. | Wellness promotion addresses mental and physical health. There is evidence of a strong relationship between physical and mental health, and linking these areas may be useful to promote positive youth development in school. The article reports the relationship between physical and mental health in all ages of children, teaching us how to promote both within schools. Schuster, Dobson, Jauregui, , ; Blanks, (2004). Wellness Lifestyles I: A Theoretical Framework Linking Wellness, Health Lifestyles, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Journal of Alternative ; Complementary Medicine, 10(2), p. 349-356. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database. | The article here is reliable, and bias. Its references can be researched and checked. | Discusses complementary and alternative medicine. How to distinguish between health, and wellness? The perspective of life chances and choices. We have a right to chose? |