Health Care Reform

Health Care Reform

The present healthcare system compared with other developed nations is currently spending more for healthcare. In 2005, the U. S. spent 15. 3% of its GDP for healthcare compared to the average 9% of others in the first world (ACP, 2008). However, despite greater spending and a wealthier economy, the number of uninsured and underinsured is still high with 47 million at present. Not a few hospitals have complained that the rising number of uninsured they serve is leading to greater financial struggles to maintain operations.

The greater national spending can be attributed to the more frequent use of technologies in the U. S. that other countries may regard as luxury (ACP, 2008). In addition, there is a marked shortage of healthcare workers. The aging healthcare workforce attests to this. There seems to be no incentive given for individuals to gain education in this field and current workers face a lot of difficulties as they perform their jobs. They are not rewarded for conducting preventive services but are greatly remunerated if the number of people seeking medical services increase.

These problems exist because of the lack of regulation on healthcare and its related industry. Other countries exert more effort to regulate this area which has a great impact on the health and well-being of their citizens. The greatly market-oriented and profit-based healthcare system in the U. S. leads to the benefit of pharmaceutical companies and greater individual expenses for those who can afford it while denying access to the underprivileged (ACP).

Clinton, McCain and Obama have presented their own versions of healthcare reform which are mainly anchored in increasing the access of the uninsured to healthcare. However, none have gone to a detailed outline of how exactly they can implement these once elected. This may be because garnering the most votes is more important than presenting a definite and concrete stand on such a complex issue which may turn off some sectors of society.



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